Columns Archives: January

How can we get our economic thinking to evolve to meet the pandemic?

  The reaction to this week’s “fiscal snapshot” was pretty much universal across media platforms – a lot of pearl-clutching and reaching for fainting couches at the size of the deficit and project net debt, followed by musings about needing to raise taxes to pay for it, tut-tutting by Conservatives about the need for some […]

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KeystoneXL is looking like a political liability rather than an asset

Last week Jason Kenney tempted fate.  And with the U.S. Supreme Court acting as its agent, fate lashed out. The Alberta premier was in the small Alberta town of Oyen on Friday, celebrated construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.  “We’re finally getting it done,” he crowed. On Monday the U.S. Supreme Court kept in place […]

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Who’s afraid of Wexit? The Conservatives, apparently.

  There have been a number of stories over the past week about the supposed rise of the new Wexit party, given that they have chosen former Conservative MP Jay Hill to be their interim leader – perhaps in the hope that Hill would give them some level of credibility that the usual swivel-eyed loons […]

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The Summer of Our Political Discontent

  To paraphrase William Shakespeare, now is the summer of our discontent.  In fact, this is the summer when the whole world seems to be smothered in a hot steaming mess of discontentment.  Look around: there’s protest and riots in the streets, fears about recession and runaway inflation abound and we’re all spooked by a […]

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Mandatory mask orders are concerning

I can’t count the number of “What will the world look like after COVID-19” stories I’ve seen going back even to April. Ah how naïve and optimistic we all were to think that this would be over in just a couple of weeks.  Indeed, my wife came across a 2020 planner the other day and […]

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Is it time for Bill Morneau to go?

  With the summer now here and the pace of news slowing, both as a function of how Ottawa operates and how the course of the COVID-19 pandemic has moved into a more stable phase, I thought I might engage in a little bit of idle speculation.  I’ve been talking to a number of people […]

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By calling the RCMP, the real winner of this Tory leadership contest is Justin

Politics is like rock’n’roll: everything has been done before.  Take the Conservative Party, for example (please).  Their leadership contest is ripping their party apart.  The Liberals did it first, however.  Jean Chrétien won the Liberal leadership in 1990, and he won majority governments in 1993, 1997 and 2000, too.  But Paul Martin and his cabal […]

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